Exhibition at the Interchurch Center now through January 4, 2016

Last night I attended the opening reception of a show featuring my work and several other artists also focusing on gentrification issues at the Interchurch Center in Manhattan. It is open Monday-Friday, 9-5 until January 4th. (It is located near Columbia University on 120th and Riverside Dr.)

Noah Fischer's Financial Relief Sculptures

Noah Fischer's Financial Relief Sculptures

Noah Fischer's Financial Relief Sculptures are on display in the center's Treasure Room, a fitting space for his beautiful and fascinating look at finance and numismatics. Also featured are the installation work by two artists, Oasa Duverney and Mildred Beltre, who weave their message in fences.

Oasa and Mildred with their work

Oasa and Mildred with their work

James and Karla Murray have been documenting the storefronts in NYC since the 1990 and have been watching their storefronts change and disappear. (I didn't get installation shots, but their website is here.)

3 of my image sets on display at the Interchurch Center

3 of my image sets on display at the Interchurch Center

Kristy Chatelain, Interchurch Center opening

Kristy Chatelain, Interchurch Center opening

This is the first time my photographs of Brooklyn Changing have been displayed for the public in print form.  Special thanks to Frank DeGregorie, the show curator!

Noah Fischer and Frank DeGregorie

Noah Fischer and Frank DeGregorie


Featured on Architectural Digest

I about nearly died with I received an email last week saying Architectural Digest was interested in publishing Brooklyn Changing. That magazine has been my guilty pleasure since I was a teen. Yes, I'd buy AD and National Geographic and not Seventeen or People. It just makes my eye go crazy and sparks my imagination which leads to lots of daydreaming and slacking off. (Hence the guilt!)  Anyways, I never would have thought this project would end up anywhere near that wonderful brand, but I am beyond excited and still a bit in shock. :)  Someone pinch me! See it all here.

Brooklyn Changing on Wired.com & The Daily Mail and more

I woke-up to quite a surprising response last Tuesday morning when Wired.com posted an interview with me and images on their website. (I knew they were posting it, I just didn't expect the response which has included requests from additional media outlets. And then there are the ones who simply took the images without asking! A friendly reminder that the images are copyrighted and you need to ask before using them and always link back to this page.)

My view on this subject is a bit different from the writer for Wired, so please bear that in mind. You can read more of my words in the Brooklyn Magazine article. I'm grateful for the posting in any case and have been enjoying discussing the broader issues associated with my subject matter. I also enjoyed an article on Curbed.com diving deeper into some of the location's histories. One commenter brought up a very good point saying: "Both this article and the Wired one miss big points. Here, what's not acknowledged is that these changes have an aggregate effect on the quality of life in the neighborhood, including its affordability and diversity. It is hard to build a community when your neighbors are priced out every two years and the new people coming in are whiter and richer than those leaving." 

I've experienced that myself and miss the community of moms I had in Greenpoint/Williamsburg. Within 3 years, almost all of my friends have either moved out of state, to the 'burbs or other parts of Brooklyn. (and at least 2 actually moved to Greenpoint from Williamsburg after I decamped to Bay Ridge.) Only those with means to own or rent stabilized apartments stayed.

Wired.com, Daily Mail, Brooklyn Magazine